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Dogs
Cranial abdominal mass due to Echinococcus multilocularis in a two-year-old wirehaired dachshund in Wallonia (Belgium)
  1. Yannick Caron1,2,
  2. Bertrand J Losson1,
  3. Calixte Bayrou2,
  4. Annick Linden3 and
  5. Frank Boue4
  1. 1 Laboratory of Parasitology and Pathology of Parasitic Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sart-Tilman B43A, Quartier Vallée II, Avenue de Cureghem 6 University of Liege, Liege, Belgium
  2. 2 Department of Morphology and Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sart-Tilman B43A, Quartier Vallée II, Avenue de Cureghem 6 University of Liege, Liege, Belgium
  3. 3 Surveillance Network of Wildlife Diseases in Southern Belgium, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sart-Tilman B43A, Quartier Vallée II, Avenue de Cureghem 6 University of Liege, Liege, Belgium
  4. 4 National Reference Laboratory for Echinococcus spp, Wildlife Surveillance and Eco-Epidemiology Unit, ANSES, Technopôle Agricole et Vétérinaire, Malzéville, France
  1. Correspondence to Dr Yannick Caron, Laboratory of Parasitology and Pathology of Parasitic Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sart-Tilman B43A, Quartier Vallée II, Avenue de Cureghem 6 University of Liege, B-4000 Liege, Belgium; ycaron{at}pasteur-kh.org

Abstract

A cranial abdominal mass on the left side was detected upon palpation in a two-and-a-half-year-old male wirehaired dachshund. No other clinical signs were recorded except exhaustion following exertion, and soft faeces. Abdominal echography showed hepatomegaly with extensive histological alterations; microscopical examination of smears from hepatic mass and fluid punction revealed a low cellularity and protoscolex-like structures. Following those findings, euthanasia was requested by the owner. Necropsy revealed a severe multifocal chronic active hepatitis with some degree of right ventricular dilatation. Based on histopathology and PCR, a diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis due to Echinococcus multilocularis was established. The dog was living in the Ardennes region in Belgium known as being endemic for E multilocularis. The present observation is in agreement with a similar canine case previously published and the high prevalence of E multilocularis in the local fox population.

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  • Received December 9, 2016.
  • Revision received February 17, 2017.
  • Accepted March 30, 2017.
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Footnotes

  • Contributors YC writes the manuscript and followed the whole case.

    BJL contributes to paper reviewing. CB

    makes histopathology and contributes to paper reviewing.

    AL contributes to paper reviewing.

    FB makes molecular analysis and contributes to paper reviewing and supervises all the work.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional data available.

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