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Mammals (other)
Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in a yak herd in Nepal
  1. Joseph William Angell1,2,
  2. John Graham-Brown3,
  3. Upendra Man Singh4 and
  4. Bhoj Raj Joshi5
  1. 1 Department of Research and Innovation, Wern Veterinary Surgeons, Unit 11, Lon Parcwr Industrial Estate, Ruthin, UK
  2. 2 Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Liverpool Institute of Infection and Global Health, Liverpool, UK
  3. 3 Infection Biology, University of Liverpool Institute of Infection and Global Health, Liverpool, UK
  4. 4 Himalayan College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Kathmandu, Nepal
  5. 5 Centre for Environmental and Agricultural Policy Research, Extension and Development (CEAPRED), Kathmandu, Nepal
  1. Correspondence to Dr Joseph William Angell; jwa{at}liv.ac.uk

Abstract

Current information on the domestic yak (Poephagus grunniens or Bos grunniens) in the Himalayan agroecological zone in Nepal is limited. Despite their isolation, yak may contact other domestic livestock particularly during the winter when they are at lower altitudes and as such they may be exposed to infectious disease. Faeces from 50 adult yak from a herd of 123 adults and 27 calves in the Kaski region of the Nepali Himalaya were analysed for the presence of gastrointestinal parasites using standard flotation and sedimentation methods. In this herd, 18 per cent (95% CI 9% to 31%) of the samples showed evidence of nematode infection, with trichostrongyle and Nematodirus/Marshallagia species eggs being detected. No trematode eggs were detected in any samples, and no Galba species or other snails were found in the environment. The herd appeared healthy with low intestinal parasitic burdens. Our findings may indicate Nematodirus/Marshallagia species infection to be exclusive to yak in this region.

  • Yak
  • Nepal
  • nematodes

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JWA and JGB conceived the project idea and carried out the fieldwork and laboratory analysis. UMS provided laboratory space and support and BRJ provided invaluable supervision, liaison, translation and guidance within the country. All authors contributed to the writing of the manuscript.

  • Funding Funding for this project was provided by a grant from the ODA Research Seed Fund from the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data statement There are no additional data available for this article.

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