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Dogs
Suspected intrapericardial lipoma in a standard schnauzer
  1. Paul Jenkins1,
  2. Soo Kuan1 and
  3. Philip Brain2
  1. 1 Surgery, Small Animal Specialist Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2 Medicine, Small Animal Specialist Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Paul Jenkins; paul.jenkins{at}sashvets.com

Abstract

A five-year-old, male, neutered standard schnauzer presented for vomiting, diarrhoea and fever. A large intrapericardial fatty mass was identified on advanced imaging. The patient underwent a median sternotomy and exploratory coeliotomy to remove the fatty mass measuring 100 mm x 76 mm x 66 mm, the histopathology of which revealed a large fatty mass with necrosis and inflammation. This is the largest reported intrapericardial fatty mass in the veterinary literature. CT at 28 weeks postoperatively revealed no evidence of recurrence.

  • intrapericardial
  • lipoma
  • schnauzer
  • vomiting
  • effusion

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Footnotes

  • Contributors PJ is the primary author, SK was the primary surgical specialist in the surgery and PB was the internal medine specialist involved in the diagnosis of the lesion.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data statement This is a case report where the data collected from the patient work up has been included in the report. The data is located in a private patient record within a veterinary hostpial server.

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