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Dogs
Chronic lameness associated with congenital hypothyroidism in three dogs
  1. Matthew A Kopke1,
  2. Varaidzo Mukorera2,
  3. Andrew L Leisewitz2 and
  4. Craig G Ruaux1
  1. 1School of Veterinary Science, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
  2. 2Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
  1. Correspondence to Dr Matthew A Kopke; m.kopke{at}massey.ac.nz

Abstract

A 4-month-old female entire Saint Bernard, a 10-month-old female spayed Great Dane and a 5-year-old male neutered Miniature Schnauzer cross poodle were presented with the primary complaint of chronic lameness. Subjectively, all three dogs were disproportionate dwarfs. Epiphysial dysgenesis was identified on survey radiographs in all three cases, along with varying degrees of secondary osteoarthrosis. Low serum thyroxine, in conjunction with low-to-normal thyroid stimulating hormone concentration, and the presence of epiphysial dysgenesis, served to confirm congenital hypothyroidism. Following commencement of synthetic thyroid hormone supplementation, resolution of clinical signs was noted within a 1-month period. Improvement in radiographic abnormalities was also seen over a 6-month period.

  • disproportionate dwarfism
  • epiphyseal dysgenesis
  • levothyroxine
  • myxoedema
  • Radiography
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Footnotes

  • Contributors MAK: Extensively involved with case management (two of the three reported cases) and drafted the manuscript. VM: Involved with case management (one of the three reported cases) and manuscript review. ALL: Involved with case management (one of the three reported cases) and manuscript review. CGR: Involved with case management (one of the three reported cases) and manuscript review.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article.

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